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Posts tagged clouds

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Roll Cloud Over Wisconsin 
Image Credit: Pierre cb, Wikipedia
Explanation: What kind of cloud is this? A type of arcus cloud called a roll cloud. These rare long clouds may form near advancing cold fronts. In particular, a downdraft from an advancing storm front can cause moist warm air to rise, cool below its dew point, and so form a cloud. When this happens uniformly along an extended front, a roll cloud may form. Roll clouds may actually have air circulating along the long horizontal axis of the cloud. A roll cloud is not thought to be able to morph into a tornado. Unlike a similar shelf cloud, a roll cloud is completely detached from their parent cumulonimbus cloud. Pictured above, a roll cloud extends far into the distance as a storm approached in 2007 in Racine, Wisconsin, USA. 
via Astronomy Picture of the Day

Roll Cloud Over Wisconsin

Image Credit: Pierre cb, Wikipedia

Explanation: What kind of cloud is this? A type of arcus cloud called a roll cloud. These rare long clouds may form near advancing cold fronts. In particular, a downdraft from an advancing storm front can cause moist warm air to rise, cool below its dew point, and so form a cloud. When this happens uniformly along an extended front, a roll cloud may form. Roll clouds may actually have air circulating along the long horizontal axis of the cloud. A roll cloud is not thought to be able to morph into a tornado. Unlike a similar shelf cloud, a roll cloud is completely detached from their parent cumulonimbus cloud. Pictured above, a roll cloud extends far into the distance as a storm approached in 2007 in Racine, Wisconsin, USA.

via Astronomy Picture of the Day

Filed under clouds roll cloud Wisconsin

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 Mammatus Clouds Over Olympic Valley   Credit &  License:  Matt Saal  (Wikipedia)

 Explanation:  What’s happened to these clouds?  Normal cloud bottoms are flat because moist warm air that rises and cools will condense into water droplets at a very specific temperature, which usually corresponds to a very specific height.    After water droplets form that air becomes an opaque cloud.    Under some conditions, however, cloud pockets can develop that contain large droplets of water or ice that fall into clear air as they evaporate.    Such pockets may occur in turbulent air near a thunderstorm, being seen near the top of an anvil cloud, for example.    Resulting mammatus clouds can appear especially dramatic if sunlit from the side.    These mammatus clouds were photographed last August over  Olympic Valley,  California,  USA.

NASA: Picture of the Day
Mammatus Clouds Over Olympic Valley
Credit & License: Matt Saal (Wikipedia)

Explanation: What’s happened to these clouds? Normal cloud bottoms are flat because moist warm air that rises and cools will condense into water droplets at a very specific temperature, which usually corresponds to a very specific height. After water droplets form that air becomes an opaque cloud. Under some conditions, however, cloud pockets can develop that contain large droplets of water or ice that fall into clear air as they evaporate. Such pockets may occur in turbulent air near a thunderstorm, being seen near the top of an anvil cloud, for example. Resulting mammatus clouds can appear especially dramatic if sunlit from the side. These mammatus clouds were photographed last August over Olympic Valley, California, USA.

NASA: Picture of the Day

Filed under NASA NASA: Picture of the Day clouds Mammatus Clouds Olympic Valley